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You've got to be in it to win it!

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Posted on 24th August 2018 at 12:07pm by Amanda Franks FIRP in Clients, Job seekers

Here we are again, in the candidate driven market. 

What does that mean? It means that demand outweighs supply; we have more jobs than we have suitable candidates! 

As a recruiter this is the hardest market to work in. It creates behaviour from applicants that we have little control over. Common symptoms of this are:

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  • Booking an appointment to meet and not showing up.
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  • Applying for so many jobs but not actually being interested in attending interviews.
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  • Inflexible on interviews times – well they have interviews for 4 other businesses that are more convenient.
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  • Accepting the first offer they receive and cancelling other interviews.
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  • Taking a job offer back to the current employer to gain a counter offer.
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  • Receiving several offers and not wanting to accept any until the last interview is complete. 
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  • Making challenging demands - I want to start late every other Thursday
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From a job seeker perspective this is a great time to be job hunting! Suddenly there is more choice and opportunity. Yes, it can create negative behaviours but after a long time of employers calling the shots suddenly more doors are open and that is a lovely position to be in.

  It is now that recruiters must change their behaviour to attract and retain the best talent. 

There is no place for pride. If your best applicant doesn’t bite your hand of for your offer be open to compromise and negotiation. Understand that wanting to wait until they have feedback from all their interviews before they accept your offer is not an insult but the best way to get a solid considered employee.

Whilst the candidates are in the driving seat the best employers will:

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  • Move fast to interview from receiving a good CV
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  • Reduce the number of interviews and perhaps make the first stage a telephone or Skype introduction
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  • Give feedback quickly, good or bad
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  • Offer even if they have only seen one person – if they’re right they’re right. Don’t wait for choice or you’ll lose them.
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  • Consider requests for changes to your initial brief - job shares, flexible working etc.
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  • Sell the benefits of working in their business and describe the potential for the candidate
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  • Work closely with an agency and have constant communication. Trust them to fill interview slots.
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  • Not look for a bargain but pay the applicant what they are worth. Be open to negotiation. 
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Employers working with a recruitment consultancy need to establish strong relationships with their consultant. Insisting on a minimal fee and sending a job description to 5 different agencies will not get you the best result. This encourages the “fling mud quickly and see what sticks” approach not to mention the constant calls from recruiters arguing who sent the CV first. It is better to engage one or two whose opinion you trust. Give your consultant time. If you want to attract the best talent and more importantly retain them, meet with your consultant and allow them to really understand what is good and bad about working in the role and the business. Be confident on who is out there representing your business.

In understanding the job market we can respond appropriately. A candidate driven market is a positive thing for both employers and job seekers. It is a time when both can get what they want if the recruitment process is managed in a positive and respectful manner.  


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